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Current Work

Archive

The Foundation Flight, Expulsion, Reconciliation collects written documents related to the subject of flight, expulsion and forced migration for its archive. The materials include testimonies, diaries, letters, regional chronicles, site documentation, town indexes and census lists, selected photographs, maps, audio and video material, and estates. The archive focuses on eyewitness accounts that document personal experiences related to forced migration.

Apart from biographical records, the archive also holds the documentation of the Foundation “House for the East German Homeland”, accumulated up to its dissolution in 1974, as well as documents of the Foundation Deutschlandhaus, gathered up to its disbandment in 1999. The archive also encompasses numerous literary estates from the collection of the Foundation Deutschlandhaus, including those of Ruth Hoffmann, Gustav Renner, Eberhard König, and Gerhard von Amyntor.

All of the holdings are systematically organized and will be made available to interested parties in the Documentation Center’s reading room.

The Foundation appreciates help in building up its collection, especially by people who have experienced flight, expulsion or forced migration themselves, or who have another personal connection with this topic. Objects that are associated with a specific part of someone’s life story are especially interesting to us.

Write to us at stories@sfvv.de or contact us by telephone.

© Foundation Flight, Expulsion, Reconciliation; Photo: Thomas BrunsMargarethe Würfel, a young teacher from the Sudetenland, was expelled from Czechoslovakia in the early summer of 1945. She set out alone on a 700-kilometer journey from the north Bohemian city of Aussig/Ústí nad Labem to Wymeer in East Frisia, where the parents of her fiancé lived. She recorded in her diary the stages of her forced journey, which she made on foot and by train between June 14 and July 4, 1945. She also wrote about the difficult and traumatic situations that she experienced underway.Chief Commander of the Russian First Army, Paul von Rennenkampff (1854-1918) addresses the people of East Prussia, asking them to cease resistance. Fighting between the Russian and German armies began at Stallupönen on August 17, 1914 and Russia swiftly conquered parts of East Prussia. After numerous failed attempts by the Germans to regain control over these lands, East Prussia was under German rule once again by March 1915.Irene Pfeiffer grew up in Taulensee (today Tułodziad, Poland) in East Prussia. She tried to flee with her family to the west in January 1945. Because the Red Army had already sealed off the way south, the family had to turn back to Taulensee. The family was finally expelled by the Polish authorities in October 1945 following months of hardship. Irene Pfeiffer’s mother died just a few days after their arrival in Brandenburg, but before she passed away, she asked her daughter to write down her experiences.
© Foundation Flight, Expulsion, Reconciliation; Photo: Thomas Bruns
Detail view of the Archive
© Foundation Flight, Expulsion, Reconciliation; Photo: Thomas Bruns
Margarethe Würfel, a young teacher from the Sudetenland, was expelled from Czechoslovakia in the early summer of 1945. She set out alone on a 700-kilometer journey from the north Bohemian city of Aussig/Ústí nad Labem to Wymeer in East Frisia, where the parents of her fiancé lived. She recorded in her diary the stages of her forced journey, which she made on foot and by train between June 14 and July 4, 1945. She also wrote about the difficult and traumatic situations that she experienced underway.
Diary of Margarethe Würfel from Ebersdorf © Foundation Flight, Expulsion, Reconciliation; Photo: Thomas Bruns
Margarethe Würfel, a young teacher from the Sudetenland, was expelled from Czechoslovakia in the early summer of 1945. She set out alone on a 700-kilometer journey from the north Bohemian city of Aussig/Ústí nad Labem to Wymeer in East Frisia, where the parents of her fiancé lived. She recorded in her diary the stages of her forced journey, which she made on foot and by train between June 14 and July 4, 1945. She also wrote about the difficult and traumatic situations that she experienced underway.
Chief Commander of the Russian First Army, Paul von Rennenkampff (1854-1918) addresses the people of East Prussia, asking them to cease resistance. Fighting between the Russian and German armies began at Stallupönen on August 17, 1914 and Russia swiftly conquered parts of East Prussia. After numerous failed attempts by the Germans to regain control over these lands, East Prussia was under German rule once again by March 1915.
Russian Army bulletin addressed to the people of East Prussia, August 18, 1914 © Foundation Flight, Expulsion, Reconciliation; Photo: Thomas Bruns
Chief Commander of the Russian First Army, Paul von Rennenkampff (1854-1918) addresses the people of East Prussia, asking them to cease resistance. Fighting between the Russian and German armies began at Stallupönen on August 17, 1914 and Russia swiftly conquered parts of East Prussia. After numerous failed attempts by the Germans to regain control over these lands, East Prussia was under German rule once again by March 1915.
Irene Pfeiffer grew up in Taulensee (today Tułodziad, Poland) in East Prussia. She tried to flee with her family to the west in January 1945. Because the Red Army had already sealed off the way south, the family had to turn back to Taulensee. The family was finally expelled by the Polish authorities in October 1945 following months of hardship. Irene Pfeiffer’s mother died just a few days after their arrival in Brandenburg, but before she passed away, she asked her daughter to write down her experiences.
The diary of Irene Pfeiffer, 1946 © Foundation Flight, Expulsion, Reconciliation; Photo: Thomas Bruns
Irene Pfeiffer grew up in Taulensee (today Tułodziad, Poland) in East Prussia. She tried to flee with her family to the west in January 1945. Because the Red Army had already sealed off the way south, the family had to turn back to Taulensee. The family was finally expelled by the Polish authorities in October 1945 following months of hardship. Irene Pfeiffer’s mother died just a few days after their arrival in Brandenburg, but before she passed away, she asked her daughter to write down her experiences.

Contact

Dr Andreas Kossert
Phone: +49 (0)30 206 29 98-15
E-Mail: Kossert@sfvv.de

Jörg Schlösser
Phone: +49 (0)30 206 29 98-23
E-Mail: Schloesser@sfvv.de

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